Intellectually honest versions of it [...]

From a common on this post Alan Kay shares a quote from Jerome Bruner that he is "a bit enthusiast about"

*for every learner you can (and need to) find an intellectually honest version of a subject they can learn if you heed their level of development

This page reveals the following quotes from Bruner

We begin with the hypothesis that any subject can be taught effectively in some intellectually honest form to any child at any stage of development. (ibid.: 33)

Which [this] by Steve Wheeler talks about Bruner's work on the scaffolding of learning. Links Bruner's work with Vygotsky and the Zone of Proximal Devellopment

Understand the user [...]

Alan Kay in comment 27 on this post writes

the number one principle in good UI design is to understand the users who are being designed for (this is importantly similar to “the number one principle in trying to teach X to Y”, is to understand Y as well as understanding X).

Which he then connects to attempts to develop a framework for CS that should have started with understanding the children.

Linking to the Know Thy Students stuff.

Homogenisation – represent processes in machines that can interpret those representations [...]

In comment 11 on this blog post Alan Kay (also has other comments) writes about the "earliest ideas about the 'essence' of computing"

are all about being able to represent processes in machines that can interpret the representations. So this is a kind of “dynamic math and dynamic reading and writing and a dynamic parts of thinking“, and the study of this and making ideas and theories about this is a science. They decided to call it “computer science” as an aspiration for the future.

Link with programming languages

Kay in a later comment mentions

This works well in a Prolog (or a Lisp or.a Logo) because they are all meta in that code is something (a) that can be looked at, and conversely (b) the stuff that can be put together to be looked at can also be interpreted as code (this is a very big idea — quite absent from the Framework’s purview even for high school — this is partly because in their limited view of things they were thinking of current HS AP in Java, and this kind of stuff is not at all straightforward in Java).

Mentioning Logo programming with 12/13 year olds with Paper/Soloman that could turn any English sentence into Pig Latin.

Byte Magazine Issue that contains the article Prolog/Robot that shows some of this.

Tweaks, templates and the LMS: exploring how to improve the learning environment [...]

- Effective learning requires high levels of contextually appropriate TPACK
- There remains a TPACK problem in higher education and its use of digital learning
- Academics - while experts in content - are largely left alone struggle with the act of creating and using digital (primarily web-based) learning environments due to their typically limited technical, multimedia and pedagogical knowledge
- This paper draws lessons from the early stages of a DBR research project at Griffith University seeking to develop ways to help improve the level of TPACK available to academics and subsequently improve the quality of the learning environments and the learning that takes place within them

 

### Misc thoughts

Blackboard 9.1 is already sort of based on templates e.g. the course contacts. But the problem is that those template haven't _evolved_. The focus on Bb and others has been on developing the broader systems. Not the individual "templates".

This is where Tweaks come in.

Tweaks also enter the picture because the standard "content item" doesn't provide any scaffolding. It's just HTML. This allows a lot of crap content (e.g. as complained about in the Bb community) but also the flexibility to do their own thing.  The same thread that complains about the crap content is the same one in which the people with knowledge boast and share their positive use of the generativity.

The tweaks are a way to develop a constructive template. To reuse the expertise to produce a certain useful display.

But they also suffer from the problem of not having been kept up to date. Perhaps again because of the focus on bigger picture - the inability to learn about the context and perhaps the gulf between the people who know that context and the developers who can do things.

h5p comes in ....

What is missing ... Goodyear and Retalis.

Examples of issues

  • The template for "Contacts" (Blackboard) has been labelled "Staff Information" in the menu. The Blackboard title can't be changed, but Griffith have decided to go another way.

Tweaks, templates and the LMS: exploring how to improve the learning environment [...]

- Effective learning requires high levels of contextually appropriate TPACK
- There remains a TPACK problem in higher education and its use of digital learning
- Academics - while experts in content - are largely left alone struggle with the act of creating and using digital (primarily web-based) learning environments due to their typically limited technical, multimedia and pedagogical knowledge
- This paper draws lessons from the early stages of a DBR research project at Griffith University seeking to develop ways to help improve the level of TPACK available to academics and subsequently improve the quality of the learning environments and the learning that takes place within them

 

### Misc thoughts

Blackboard 9.1 is already sort of based on templates e.g. the course contacts. But the problem is that those template haven't evolved. The focus on Bb and others has been on developing the broader systems. Not the individual "templates".

This is where Tweaks come in.

Tweaks also enter the picture because the standard "content item" doesn't provide any scaffolding. It's just HTML. This allows a lot of crap content (e.g. as complained about in the Bb community) but also the flexibility to do their own thing.  The same thread that complains about the crap content is the same one in which the people with knowledge boast and share their positive use of the generativity.

The tweaks are a way to develop a constructive template. To reuse the expertise to produce a certain useful display.

But they also suffer from the problem of not having been kept up to date. Perhaps again because of the focus on bigger picture - the inability to learn about the context and perhaps the gulf between the people who know that context and the developers who can do things.

h5p comes in ....

What is missing ... Goodyear and Retalis.

Expertise for content development [...]

Jegan & Eswaran (2004) suggest that

Content development requires expertise from different fields. The design and development of content require major inputs from instructors, instructional designers, graphic designers, and programmers. Normally instructors are expected to develop the content for e-learning on their own. The design and development of content is not an easy task for instructors who lack experience in instructional strategies and learning theories. They are not aware of the effective methods, which can be used to present their content to learners.

And the need that

The content development team needs a method, which can capture the strategies developed by the experts based on their experiences with specific sets of problems Patterns have emerged as a solution to overcome this difficulty.

And constructive templates

Patterns are implemented by using constructive templates. A well-designed pattern can have more than one template.....The templates generate interactive content with good and customizable user interfaces as solutions for the patterns.

References

Jegan, T., & Eswaran, C. (2004). Patterns for E-learning content development. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 15(2), 117-.

NGDLE – Next Generation Digital Learning Environment [...]

EDUCAUSE define the NGDLE as

a digital learning architecture encompassing a confederation of learning applications, tools, and resources woven together by means of open standards.

In part, because of the inherent variety

What is clear is that postsecondary learning is far too diverse to be enabled adequately by a single application or platform. Therefore, it seems legitimate to conclude that any LMS will always need to be supplemented by additional components and resources, resulting in a digital learning environment instead of an LMS platform.

Raising the question of who decides what supplements are allowed?